Tag: habits

 

CONFUCIUS.001

In today’s world of instant gratification, we might get discouraged when we don’t see immediate success. But we need to remember that moving slowly is ok as long as we keep going!

We’ve come to expect instant success, because that’s all we hear about in the media {and see in perfectly polished social media accounts}. It’s always the stories of overnight success that seem to pop up. Unfortunately we rarely hear the “after 10 years of laborious work” or “after consistent action day in and day out” stories.

Take Eat Pray Love {book and movie} for example. What do we know about Elizabeth Gilbert’s success story? She was unhappy, hoped on a plane, visited three countries, discovered who she was, wrote a book and boom she was an instant access. Very few actually know that she was already an established writer with a few books under her belt, and she got a publishing agent to buy the rights of the future book and gave her money upfront to finance her amazing adventure. So yes Gilbert did have a huge success with this book, but she was already a travel writer for years.

I am not saying that overnight success does not happen. It can happen, but it doesn’t happen as often as we seem to think.

And I am not here to preach. In fact, I am guilty of this too. Actually, it feels like I am writing this post more for myself than anyone else! I used to have these vicious cycles that would start with working really really hard, and then I’d collapse when I didn’t see immediate results. I would get very discouraged and feel like a complete failure. And then it would take me ages until I could lift myself up again and get motivated to keep going.

For me it’s a habit engrained from my school days when I used to study really hard at the last minute, cramming it all in, having all-nighters to write that paper or to study for the finals and actually doing pretty well for a few days work. So once I realised this, I decided I had to change it. And when I came across this quote it was such a revelation. I needed to switch from being a sprinter to being a marathon runner.

Don’t get me wrong, I still catch myself saying {mostly while scrolling through Instagram} “why am I still not there?” with “there” being whatever I am working at the moment. But now {most of the times} I have a quick wake up call, turn Instagram off and get back to work.

So what I am trying to say is this: don’t get discouraged.  Don’t give up. Keep going and you will get there. Just keep going.

“It does not matter how slow you go as long as you don’t stop.” Confucius

 

Multitasking.001

Oh I remember the days when I used to write on my CV that I was a great multitasker. And go to interview after interview and say it again and again. Multitasking was the thing at the time.

Especially in the world of advertising and marketing I found myself in. You really had to constantly answer phone calls and emails and requests coming at you at all times while trying to concentrate on writing an important report or come up with a client strategy.

And {I thought} I was good at it…until I wasn’t. I reached a point when I found it extremely difficult to work that way. So if I had some serious thinking to do I used to put my earphones on —even if i wasn’t listening to anything — put up a “do not disturb” sign and keep my head down.

Guess what? people still interrupted me. “Maria I see you have your do not disturb sign on, but can I ask you a quick question?” Nooooooooooooooooooooo.

And people thought I was weird. Rigid. Not one for the team etc etc.

But all I knew was that multitasking was just not working for me.

And guess what? Science backs me up.

Research now shows that multitasking (or actually constant task switching as the scientists call it) lowers your IQ and hinders your performance.

A study at the University of London found that when we multitask our IQ drops by 15 points. And researchers at Stanford University showed that multitaskers performed worse than those concentrating on just one task at a time. This is because the brain has a harder time switching from one task to another.

Although we think that multitasking is efficient, it’s actually the opposite. Not only it takes us longer to complete each task, but we also perform worse when we’re constantly switching between tasks.

So let’s stop multitasking and let’s start mono-tasking. 

Tschus,

Maria

PS How about you? Do you consider yourself a great multitasker? Have you tried to do less task-switching?

Get in touch

Have a question to ask? Want to have a chat before signing up to one of our services? Please use the form below to get in touch. We'd love to hear from you.

Name
Email
Message

Thank you for getting in touch. We'll get back to you shortly.
Oops! There seems to be an error! Please check the fields and send again.
© Copyright 2017 Confidence Inside Out